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peanut plant

Peanuts still remain one of the most popular food choices for many garden birds, particularly in times when highly calorific food is needed. Peanuts offer a really good balance of oil and protein, both of which are necessary for energy and good health.

Just how calorific peanuts are, can be evidenced by the fact that they very rarely appear in any human dieting regimens and if they do – you are only allowed a small handful at a time! More...

moulting robin

What is moulting?

Moulting is the name given to the process that takes place when birds shed their old feathers to make space for new plumage.

How long a bird will take to moult, and the length of time their moult takes is dependent on the species, age and time of year. 

Some birds moult all of their feathers in one go over the course of a few weeks, while others shed their old feathers gradually over the course of an entire year! More...

I am often contacted by people who have found a young garden bird (or birds) sitting on the ground, which look as if they have been abandoned by their parents and are giving cause for concern.

The first thing to say, it is very common and I would say that in over 95% of cases, there is no need to be worried or to intervene. This gorgeous young robin is clearly doing very well for himself and feathering up.

 

Most youngsters that are found are feathered fledgelings, doing as nature intended and leaving the nest to check out the big wide world before taking to the sky. Most of our garden birds will fledge once they are fully feathered ( at about 2 weeks of age) but before they are able to fly. They tend to hop out and spend a day or two on the ground finishing off the development of their flight feathers, which would otherwise take up too much space and be too uncomfortable in the confines of an outgrown nest! This young robin may look like he needs help, but actually he is just a bit behind the one above and you can see he still needs to grow flight feathers ( and a tail!) but his eye is bright. The Sparrow is also just young and needs his parents.